Barbara Moulard

Faculty Assoc
Faculty
TEMPE Campus
Mailcode
1505
Faculty Assoc
Faculty
TEMPE Campus
Mailcode
1505
Faculty Assoc
Faculty
TEMPE Campus
Mailcode
1505

Biography

Barbara Moulard grew up in Decatur, Georgia, adjacent to Atlanta. Her maternal grandparents travelled through the Southwest. They brought back souvenirs and photos and subscribed to “Arizona Highways” magazine. She fell in love with the images of Arizona: the paintings of blue deer and multi colored horses by Navajo artist, the Sonoran desert filled with Saguaro and other exotic plants and animals, and the mysterious ancient pueblo and adobe ruins such as Batatkin and Kiet Siel. The strange names of the people and places inspired her to want to know more. At about the age of 10, she knew that she would wind up here.  

Fifteen years later, Moulard arrived at Arizona State University with a dual undergraduate degree in studio arts and art history with an idealistic determination to achieve an understanding of American Indian Art History. She received her master's in art history after five years. Her master's thesis was published under the title "Within the Underworld Sky: Mimbres Ceramic Art in Context." That is an iconological study of black-on-white painted ceramics of the Classic Mimbres of Southwest New Mexico and how it related to surrounding contemporary cultures the Hohokam of the Phoenix and Tucson Basins, and Pueblo of Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. The idealistic determination that brought her to Arizona has not wavered since. She continues to research, lecture, curate exhibitions, and publish in the area of Pre-Contact Southwest art. Her focus of research is the art of the cultures that lived in what is called the Greater Southwest: the Four Corner States of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Nevada, and southern California and the northern states of Mexico – Sonora and Chihuahua.

Moulard has to have as thorough an understanding as possible of the social, political and religious structure of contemporary Southwest Indian peoples, such as the Pueblo and O’ohdam, as well as the archaeology of the contemporaneous Mesoamerican cultures, such as the Toltec and Aztec, to form sound inferences concerning her research. The Greater Southwest is the northern frontier of Mesoamerica and what happened there happened here and a good deal of goods from here wound up there in trade such as turquois and cotton – raw and finished. Actually as an undergraduate, she had thought that she’d pursue an advanced degree in what was then called Pre-Columbian art – now referred to as either Pre-Conquest of Pre-Contact art, but those plans changed after visiting the Hopi mesas and discovering first hand ancient ceramic art of the Classic Mimbres and Hohokam peoples. In 2002, a second publication, "Re-Creating the Word: Painted Ceramics of the Prehistoric Southwest," built on her previous research and innovations in the field of Southwest studies. Presently, she is working as one scholar of several on an exhibit and catalogue on the art and iconography of Classic Mimbres painted ceramics for the Art Institute of Chicago. 

After graduating from ASU, she took a curatorial position at Pueblo Grande Museum an archaeological Hohokam ruin and park in Phoenix. She team taught a Mexican Art course for ASU in the late 80s; she had also curated and written the catalogue for an exhibit at the Mesa Southwest Museum of Viceregal Mexican art in 1988 called “Tabula Rasa Art of the Mexican Viceroyalty” that included 60 works of fine arts – painting, sculpture and prints ranging in date from 1523-1810 from a number of major U.S. museums. Looking back on that experience, she is astounded that this happened, but at the time she was young and no one told her that it could not be done. When she left Pueblo Grande Museum in 1995, the Art Department asked her to develop the art history course Mexican Art. She filled in an important gap in her knowledge of the subject by taking a post-graduate course from Professor Stacy Widdifield on 19th century Mexican art history. She has travelled several times to Mexico to visit many of the locations of art featured in the Mexican Art course.  

Moulard is a faculty associate and as such usually teaches only one or two art history courses a semester. She is also teaching the courses The Art of Africa Oceania and the Americas and Native Arts of North America, in addition to the on-line Mexican Art course. The remainder of her professional time outside of ASU is spent consulting, research and writing in the areas of Pre-Contact Southwest art.

Education

  • M.A. Art History, Arizona State University
  • Bachelor's degrees. Studio Arts and Art History, Arizona State University

Publications

2020  Objects of Prestige and Power: Prehistoric Southwest Jewelry, co-author Charles Matthew Thomas with a Preface by Richard Townsend, University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque.

2010  “Monumental Nayarit, Lagunillas (Chinesco) Female Figure, Type A Style, Kneeling/Seated Female Figure,” Bonhams African, Oceanic and Pre-Columbian Art, Bonhams, New York, Sale 18631, Lot #6316. (Auction catalogue entry and annotated essay: 2 pages)

2005  “Archaism and Emulation in Casas Grandes Painted Pottery,” In Casas Grandes and the Ancient Art of the Southwest, Richard Townsend, ed., The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, pp 67-97.

2004  “The Art of Personal Adornment,” In The Collecting Passions of Dennis and Janis Lyon, Heard Museum, Phoenix, pp. 34-55.

2002  Re-Creating the Word: Painted Ceramics of the American Southwest, Schenck Southwest Publishing, Santa Fe. (227 pages)

2002  Ancient Origins: American Southwest Pottery A.D. 600-1600, Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, Florida, St. Petersburg. (88 pages)

1993  “Form, Function and Interpretation of Mimbres Ceramics,” In Arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, Select Readings, Janet Catherine Berlow and Lee Anne Wilson, eds., Prentice Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, pp. 259-270.  Reprinted in abridged form from Phoebus 4, Anthony Lacy Gully, ed. Art History Faculty, Arizona State University, Tempe, 1985, pp. 89-98.

1991  “Pottery Through the Ages: Traditions in Clay,” Profiles 11, Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary and City of Phoenix, Phoenix. (8 pages)

1991  Ancient Mexico: Ceramic Vessels from Colima and Casas Grandes, Johnson County Community College, Gallery of Art, Overland Park, Kansas. (10 pages)

1989  Pre-Columbian Gold from the Edith Broad Collection, Phoenix Art Museum, Phoenix. (4 pages)

1989  “Book Review: Feathered Serpents and Flowering Trees: Reconstructing the Murals of Teotihuacán,” Latin American Art, Vol. 1, No. 1, p. 53.

1988  Tabula Rasa: Art of the Mexican Viceroyalty, Mesa Southwest Museum, Mesa. (40 pages)

1985  “Form, Function and Interpretation of Mimbres Ceramics,” Phoebus 4, Anthony Lacy Gully, ed. Art History   Faculty, Arizona State University, Tempe, pp. 89-98.

1984  Within the Underworld Sky: Mimbres Ceramic Art in Context, Twelvetrees Press, Pasadena, California.  (159    pages)

1977  “Photographer of the Indian Forests, Lady Mabel Eardley-Wilmot: 1866-1956.” Northlight 7, Photography/History      of Photography Faculty, School of Art, Arizona State University, Tempe, pp. 25-29.

Research Activity

Exhibit Consultant and Contributing Author, Art Institute of Chicago in conjunction with Princeton University Art Museum and Yale University Press.

May 2016 – November 2018

I am presently a consultant to and contributing author for and exhibit and exhibit catalogue featuring the ceramic art of the Classic Mimbres, ancient peoples of the American Southwest, organized by the Art Institute of Chicago with guest curator Bryan R. Just, Curator and Lecturer, Princeton Art Museum to open at the Art Institute of Chicago in October 2018 and travel to Princeton Art Museum and possibly two other venues.  Research and review the selection of objects and catalogue entries for the publication.  

Research for my catalogue essay focuses on an argument in support of using ethnographic analogy in the form of Pueblo oral traditions (myths and tales) and visual ceremonial art to interpret form function and meaning in Mimbres iconography.  Specific examples pottery paintings feature images that reference rite-of-passage rituals such as birth, puberty (as well as possible representations of societal initiation rites – Warrior Societies or Healing Societies), marriage, and death.  These images are considered in the context of the form and function of the ceramic and as well as the coloration and design components of the painted composition.

 

Courses

Fall 2018
Course Number Course Title
ARS 394 Special Topics
ARS 465 Native Art of North America
Summer 2018
Course Number Course Title
ARS 394 Special Topics
Spring 2018
Course Number Course Title
ARS 202 Art of Africa/Oceania/Americas
ARS 394 Special Topics
Fall 2017
Course Number Course Title
ARS 394 Special Topics
ARS 465 Native Art of North America
Spring 2017
Course Number Course Title
ARS 394 Special Topics
Fall 2016
Course Number Course Title
ARS 202 Art of Africa/Oceania/Americas
Fall 2015
Course Number Course Title
ARS 202 Art of Africa/Oceania/Americas
ARS 394 Special Topics
Fall 2014
Course Number Course Title
ARS 394 Special Topics
ARS 465 Native Art of North America

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